1) Idealizing Women in the Italian Renaissance 


Organizers: Elena Brizio (Georgetown University - Fiesole Campus); Marco Piana (McGill University)


Session’s Chair: TBA


Between the fifteenth and seventeenth century, Italy witnessed a lively debate regarding the role of women in society, history and religion. Contemporary authors, both men and women, appealed to the authority of classical and medieval philosophers in complex and nuanced ways to redefine the idea of womanhood in a changing society. Despite this open and fruitful dialogue, women were often idealized according to a strict model of female virtue based on a culture of honor and chastity that was reflected in the arts as well as in law and daily life. The aim of this panel, therefore, is that of analyzing how women were idealized, what rhetorical, philosophical, or historical tools were used, and how this vision differs from theory and practice. Papers might focus on (but are not limited to) the following aspects of this comparison across the early modern world from 1400-1700 CE:

  • Iconographic representations of idealized women, and the different requests in male and female art patrons;
  • Idealized women in literature and theatre;
  • Idealized representations of the self in the visual arts and in literature;
  • Idealization of women in philosophical texts as well as in their sources;
  • Personal practices of piety and the devotional trends active within or outside Church orthodoxy;
  • Sumptuary laws and their importance in 'making or breaking' the image of a woman;
  • Manipulation of rules, accommodation of conflicts, social negotiation.
Please send an abstract in English or Italian, a 150-250 word bio, an AV request and, if possible, 1 page CV to eb893@georgetown.edu and/or marco.piana@mail.mcgill.ca by January 10, 2018.




2) Italy in the Mediterranean and the Mediterranean in Italy


Organizer: Rosario Pollicino (University of Western Ontario)


Session's Chair: TBA


The Mediterranean has always been a geographic area of important movements and crossings from the ancient until contemporary times. This session focuses on the relationship Italy has with the Mediterranean intended as link, which goes beyond the simple geographic area by highlighting connections, which have been established through history, and historical facts that are still relevant today. 

In regards to Humanities, this session welcomes any cultural production embedding but not limited to literature, poetry, films and media, artifacts, photography, plays and more but an interdisciplinary approach is also encouraged. We seek to understand what are the messages these artistic expressions manifest and the heterogeneity that comes out of them while still being connected. Although a focus on modern and contemporary period is preferred this panel accepts also presentation of any time period related to Italy and the Mediterranean. A comparative approach is also welcome especially with other nationalities/cultures involved with the theme or through different cultural productions or disciplines.


The presentations may include but are not limited to the following topics through any theoretical approach:

  • Italy and the Maghreb
  • Italy and the Former Yugoslavia
  • Italy and the Dodecanese
  • Migration through the Mediterranean
  • Jews Studies and the Mediterranean
  • Globalization and Nationalism in the Mediterranean
  • Holocaust in the Mediterranean
  • WWI, WWII and the Mediterranean
  • Women and Gender Studies in the Mediterranean

Please submit an abstract in English, Italian or French and a short bio to Rosario Pollicino, Western University, (rpollici@uwo.ca) by February 15, 2018.




3) Italian Studies in the Digital age

 

Organizers: Isabella Magni (Newberry Library (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow)); Andrea Penso (Vrije Universiteit Brussel – VUB (FWO Postodoctoral Fellow))


Session's Chair: TBA


In the past few years we are witnessing a tumultuous development of the digital humanities on an international scale, offering innovative research and teaching methods, often leading to new questions, reading and interpretations. The panel aims to open a discussion to investigate how Italian Studies are dealing with technological and methodological innovations, to understand the developments, risks and potentials, and to discuss future prospects of the discipline. Topics may include: 

  • application of new technologies to any aspect of Italian studies (literature, culture, arts, cinema etc.); 
  • digital editions and digital projects, completed or in progress; 
  • individual case studies or collaborations; 
  • working groups engaged in the digitization process of big amounts of data; 
  • social, gender, cultural and multicultural aspects of digital humanities; 
  • digital methods: achievements and setbacks; 
  • digital humanities in pedagogy and curricula; 

Please send an abstract in English or Italian and a short bio to andrea.penso@vub.ac.be and magnii@newberry.org by February 15, 2018.




4) Travel in Italy and Italians Travelling Abroad

 

Organizer: Cristina Perissinotto (University of Ottawa)


Session's Chair: TBA


Papers are sought that address the discourse of travel, identity and the individual in Italian

culture. We seek papers about travel in Italy, as well as about Italian travelers abroad. We would like to see papers from a wide range of theoretical and cultural perspectives, including anthropology, women’s studies, literary criticism and cultural studies. Papers may be presented in English, French or Italian.

 

Possible topics might include:

  • alienation and displacement
  • cartography
  • orientalism
  • women's travel
  • travel and identity formation
  • travel and the construction of the other
  • travel as pilgrimage
  • travel and languages

If you need audiovisual equipment, please indicate your requirements in your submission.


Please submit a 150-word abstract for a 20-minute paper, plus a one-page CV to cperissi@uottawa.ca. Submissions will only be accepted if pasted in the body of an email message (regretfully, no attachment will be opened). Please don’t forget to include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than January 20th, 2018.




5) Teaching Italian in the Age of Hybrid and Mega Classes


Organizer: Cristina Perissinotto (University of Ottawa)

 

Session's Chair: TBA


Discussion of teaching methods of Italian in the era of hybrid courses, mega classes, and MOOCs. It will be an occasion to analyze strategies, best practices, and exchange information. Brief presentations of books published in this field by the participants are welcome. 


If you need audiovisual equipment, please indicate your requirements in your submission.


Please submit a 150-word abstract for a 20-minute paper, plus a one-page CV to cperissi@uottawa.ca. Submissions will only be accepted if pasted in the body of an email message (regretfully, no attachment will be opened). Please don’t forget to include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than January 20th, 2018.




6) Italian Utopian and Intentional Communities Past and Present


Organizer: Cristina Perissinotto (University of Ottawa)

 

Session's Chair: TBA


Papers are sought that address the topic of intentional and utopian communities past and present in Italian geography, culture and literature. These spaces can be physical, mental, linguistic, political, cultural, spiritual, virtual and literary. Papers may be presented in English, French or Italian.


Possible topics might include:


  • Preplanned cities of the Renaissance
  • Intentional communities in Italy
  • Terra di Lei
  • Nomadelfia
  • Intentional communities and urban development
  • Films on utopian communities
  • Utopian representations of geographical, imaginary or spiritual places
  • Ideal representations of communal life
  • Religious and secular intentional communities
  • The Internet and the formation of Intentional Communities
  • Utopia and dystopia in Italian culture and society
  • Literary utopias past and present
  • La città del sole by Campanella
  • La città felice by Francesco Patrizi da Cherso
  • Sforzinda
  • Pienza
  • Palmanova


If you need audiovisual equipment, please indicate your requirements in your submission.


Please submit a 150-word abstract for a 20-minute paper, plus a one-page CV to cperissi@uottawa.ca. Submissions will only be accepted if pasted in the body of an email message (regretfully, no attachment will be opened). Please don’t forget to include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than January 20, 2018.




7) Works in Progress


Organizer: Benedetta Lamanna (University of Toronto)


Session's Chair: TBA


This session seeks to showcase papers by current undergraduate and graduate students of Italian Studies and related programs. While the session will focus on PhD theses currently in progress, the session also welcomes papers by students who have not yet begun the thesis stage of their degree. Papers from across disciplines and time periods are welcome.


Please submit a 150-word abstract in English, Italian or French and a short biographical blurb to b.lamanna@mail.utoronto.ca by January 15th, 2018. Please include your email address, institutional contact information and any audiovisual needs in your submission.




8) Universities and Local Communities


Organizer: Pietro Pirani (Western University)

 

Session's Chair: TBA

 

Contributions are sought for a round table that intends to provide a general overview of the multiple forms of interaction between higher education institutions and local Italian communities. We are particularly interested in examples (and relative evaluations) of community engaged learning, community service, and any forms of support or mutual support between the institution (department, program, single courses) and the community (individuals and/or organizations).


Please submit a 150-word abstract and a short biography to Pietro Pirani (ppirani2@uwo.ca). Please include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than February 15, 2018.




9) Intersections of Philosophy and Politics in Italian Philosophical Thought


Organizer: Antonio Calcagno (King’s University College at the University of Western Ontario)


Session's Chair: TBA


Ever since its inception in medieval times, Italian philosophy has developed in dialogue with political thought—contemporary thinkers such as Negri, Agamben, Cavarero, and Esposito are the most recent rendition of a civic commitment and attention to communal life that have characterized Italian thought since Dante through Campanella, Machiavelli, Croce, Gentile, and Gramsci, just to name a few. This panel explores themes, notions, limits, possibilities, and alternative political models addressed by Italian theorists when they engage a theoretical reflection inspired not only by abstract philosophical concepts but also by the concreteness and everydayness of social and political life—at that intersection, notions such as community, relationality, sociality, socio-political responsibility, biopolitics, sovereignty, authority, legitimacy, inclusiveness, coexistence, and many others emerge.

 

Please submit a 100-word abstract and a short biography to Antonio Calcagno (acalcagn@uwo.ca). Please include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than February 15, 2018.




10) Pirandello e il cinema

 

Organizer: Giuliana Sanguinetti Katz (University of Toronto)

 

Session's Chair: TBA


I rapporti di Pirandello con il cinema sono mutevoli e contrastanti. Nei suoi primi contatti con il cinema lo vede come un mezzo meccanico e disumanante che toglie la vita agli attori e li riduce ad ombre (Quaderni di Serafino Gubbio operatore, 1915), e anche più tardi lo considera una forma di comunicazione di molto inferiore al teatro  (“Se il film parlante abolirà il teatro”, 1929). Tuttavia nel 1924 in un’intervista pubblicata su Les Nouvelles Litteraires lo scrittore dichiara che grazie a un film russo a cui ha assistito durante la guerra ha intravisto le possibilità presenti in questa giovane arte: “il Sogno, il Ricordo, l’Allucinazione, la Follia, lo Sdoppiamento della personalità.” Secondo questa sua visione del cinema, Pirandello scriverà dei soggetti e dei trattamenti cinematografici che traducono in forma visiva argomenti tratti dalle sue novelle e commedie. Le opere di Pirandello hanno avuto una forte influenza sul cinema fin dall’inizio: sono diventate soggetti cinematografici realizzati da vari registi (L’Herbier, Camerini, George Fitzmaurice ecc.) o hanno ispirato con le loro teorie i film di altri registi (Fellini, Antonioni, Pasolini, Truffaut, Woody Allen ecc.).

 

Possibili argomenti per una relazione sono:

 

  • i rapporti di Pirandello con il cinema, come appaiono nei suoi scritti (il romanzo Quaderni di Serafino Gubbio operatore, i suoi articoli sul cinema, i suoi scenari per il cinema);
  • la presenza di tecniche cinematografiche nelle opere di Pirandello;
  • l’analisi di un film su un’opera di Pirandello o ispirato da Pirandello.

Si prega di inviare il curriculum vitae (1 pagina al massimo), il titolo della presentazione e un riassunto di 150 parole a giuliana@look.ca entro il 10 febbraio 2018.




11) Perché autotradursi?

 

Organizer: Arianna Dagnino (The University of Ottawa)


Session's Chair: TBA


Self-translation has always been present in the Italian literary scene, although this practice has rarely been acknowledged and its study has been most often neglected.


In the past, self-translations by Italian writers have been offered, at various times, and in different language combinations  (e.g., Italo Calvino, Beppe Fenoglio, Carlo Goldoni, Luigi Pirandello). More recently, a high level of bilingualism due migration, exile, or transnational lifestyles triggered by post-colonial and post-war developments has produced a new wave of self-translations, within and outside Italy. We are inviting proposals to reveal and dissect the practice of self-translation both as a process – of linguistic mediation, cultural negotiation and/or creative “transmutation” (Octavio Paz) – and as a product, with all that concerns publication trends, market-related restrictions, readers’ response and critics’ reception.


The reasons that lead a writer to self-translate (or not to self-translate, as Tim Parks argues) his/her work are manifold and often overlapping. It is striking, however, that publishers are rarely keen to advertise their publications as self-translations. Again, the reasons behind this reticence are manifold and require further study.

This panel offers the opportunity to explore the question of its title  – “Perché autotradursi?” – in the widest possible way, embracing any historical timeframe and from any specific point of view, be it that of:


  •  the emerging or already established writer;
  •  the independent or trade publisher;
  •  the monolingual or bilingual (if not multilingual) reader;
  •  the literary critic or the scholar;
  •  the language combination itself, and its relation to the socio-linguistic web of global power dynamics.


Please submit an abstract in English, Italian, French or Spanish and a short bio to Arianna Dagnino, The University of Ottawa, (adagnino@uottawa.ca),  by February 15, 2018.




12) Teaching in an international environment: Round Table


Organizers: Hoang Truong & Tiziana Serafini (UCLA & University of Notredame)


Session’s Chair: TBA


In this era of globalization, our teaching environment is constantly evolving. Our Italian classrooms are populated by an increasing number of students coming from different countries, and the Internet allows for multiple ways and tools to promote inter-cultural communication. The new generations of learners are eager and ready to cross boundaries through awareness of cultural differences and self-reflection. How are we teachers facing these changes? Are we taking advantage of these situations to foster a globalization of learning? And how are we keeping up with these changes from the stand point of professional development?

 

This round table invites contributions in the areas of pragmatics, development of empathetic behavior, reflectivity, self-awareness, social justice, and social action through the teaching of Italian.


If you need audiovisual equipment, please indicate your requirements in your submission.


Please submit a 150-word abstract for a 15-minute paper, plus a one-page CV to truong@humnet.ucla.eduPlease don’t forget to include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than February 10, 2018.




13) 1968 : Italy and the World


Organizers: Hoang Truong & Helen Sage-Lee (UCLA)


Session’s Chair: TBA


This session invites scholars to a dialogue on the history shaping year of 1968. A year which was marked by the Vietnamese Tet Offensive and the escalation of discontentment with the US   involvement in Vietnam.  Within the United States, disapproval of the war and calls for peace may have been partly due to American fatalities. However, this discontentment acted as a catalyst for other civil movements in countries such as France and Italy although they were not directly participating in the conflict. These movements were influenced by the media and propaganda from all government levels and partisanship of journalism. 


This session hopes to bring together all points of view, and in particular how Italians view those events which affected the outcome of Italian social movements.


If you need audiovisual equipment, please indicate your requirements in your submission.


Please submit a 150-word abstract for a 15-minute paper, plus a one-page CV to truong@humnet.ucla.eduPlease don’t forget to include your email address and institutional contact information. Submissions expected no later than February 10, 2018.




14) Round Table.  Study Tour Abroad: Issues, Challenges and Rewards


Organizer: Paola Basile (Lake Erie College)


Session’s Chair: TBA


We are aware of the benefits for our students to study abroad. We encourage our students to study abroad for a semester, for a year, to take an internship abroad, or we go as far as to create a field trip abroad as part of our courses. This round table would like to invite participants to discuss issues, challenges, obstacles that professors have to face when they organize a study tour abroad as well as their students' reactions & comments, and the positive outcomes.


Please submit an abstract in English or Italian and a short bio to Paola Basile (pbasile@lec.edu) by February 15, 2018.




15) Italian Studies: Technology and (Un)employment


Organizers: Antonio Marturano (Università Tor Vergata, Roma); Jana Vizmuller-Zocco (York University, Toronto)

 

Session’s Chair: TBA


This session aims to investigate the cultural implications of technology and (un)employment from the perspective of Italian Studies. Expressions of the impact that technological advancements have on work are part and parcel of Italian culture (in films, such as Io e Caterina; in novels, for ex., of Paolo Volponi, or Francesco Verso;  in visual art: Futurismo, etc.).


Technology has come to replace human workers not only in repetitive tasks but also in more complex occupations. Technological breakthroughs in artificial intelligence keep developing rapidly; the trend indicates  that no occupation or profession will be immune to technological progress. The proponents of technology extol its beneficial aspects for humanity (medical, lifestyle, etc.), and the critics propose various doomsday scenarios (general unemployment, economic divide, hopelessness, etc.). But the consensus from both sides appears to lay in increased education and re-training both to keep working, as well as keep oneself otherwise occupied. 


Contributions which take account of the writings of philosophers, political thinkers, literary critics, such as Antonio Gramsci, Giorgio Agamben, Gianni Vattimo, Alberto Abbruzzese are welcome.


Topics to be explored include, but are not restricted to, the following:

  • Italian approaches  to technological (un)employment: educational, philosophical, social, political, economic, literary, etc.
  • Italian popular culture and technological (un)employment: film, science fiction, i gialli, music,  etc.
  • Italian Weltanschauung with regards to technological (un)employment
  • Pedagogical strategies and curricula contents vis-à-vis technological (un)employment
  • Role of Italian studies in view of reduced workload or jobless future
  • Italian (im)/(e)migration, technological change, and work
  • Italian language and technological (un)employment

Please submit an abstract in English or Italian and a short bio to a.marturano@gmail.com and jvzocco@yorku.ca,  by February 15, 2018.




16) Social Advancement and Networking in Early 20th Century Female Action


Organizers: Sandra Parmegiani (University of Guelph); Cristina Caracchini (University of Western Ontario)

 

Session’s Chair: TBA


This session welcomes contributions on Italian women of the first half of the 20th century whose work outside of the domestic sphere represented a model of social advancement through writing, literary enterprises, educational projects, or social action. The areas to be explored can also include women’s collaborative projects in a variety of fields, from philanthropic enterprises to creative collaborations and political activity. How did these women’s thought and action impact the rules of civil society? Why are they remembered or forgotten, and which societal forces are facilitating or preventing the reclamation of their memory and the celebration of their legacy?


Please submit a 150 word-abstract in English or Italian and a short bio to Parmegiani Sandra (sparmegi@uoguelph.ca) and Caracchini Cristina (ccaracch@uwo.ca)  by February 15, 2018.




17) Vices, Virtues, and the Senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance


Organizers: Eleonora Buonocore (University of Calgary); Giulia Cardillo (James Madison University)


Session’s Chair: TBA


This panel investigates the connection between the ethical and the epistemological aspects of Medieval and Renaissance Italian Poetry through an analysis of the five senses and the seven virtues and vices. How do our senses inform our experience and understanding of the virtues and vices? Does the sight of food lead to gluttony? Or can it spark temperance? What is the role of the will? Or is it in fact the vice/ virtue that shapes how we perceive the world through the senses? We seek contributions from various literary, philosophical, and theological perspectives spanning from the Middle Ages to the Late Renaissance.  


We invite proposals for twenty-minute papers, in either English or Italian, which include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

 

  • The seven deadly sins
  • The four cardinal virtues and the three theological virtues
  • The five senses
  • Chivalric virtues
  • Application of Aristotelian ethics in literature


Please, send a 200-word abstract and a brief bio to Eleonora Buonocore (eleonora.buonocore@ucalgary.ca) and Giulia Cardillo (cardilgx@jmu.edu) by January 28th, 2018.




18) (Re)reading Calvino Today


Organizer: Luca Pocci (Western University)


Session’s Chair: TBA


Today the critical literature on Italo Calvino is not only a considerable corpus but also a body of texts which is increasingly growing and expanding. Calvino is a vastly read and re-read, studied and re-studied, author. On the basis of this cultural and critical fact, the proposed session invites contributions on the plurality of aspects that may be invoked in order to explore and explain the value of Calvino’s work at/for the beginning of the third millennium. In particular, the purpose of the proposed session is to answer the following question: in what sense, and in which ways, can we say that Calvino’s fiction and/or non-fiction help us to better navigate the present, to better map and prefigure the future, and, last but not least, to better understand history and come to terms with the past?

  • The values of lightness, quickness, exactitude, visibility, multiplicity
  • Calvino’s pathos of distance
  • Calvino’s combinatorial poetics
  • Utopia and cities of the mind
  • Calvino’s visual imagination
  • The real and the fantastic

Please submit a 150-word abstract for a 20-minute paper and a short bio to Luca Pocci (lpocci@uwo.ca) by February 15, 2018. If you need audiovisual equipment, please indicate your requirements in your submission.




19) Intersectional Feminism in Italy


Organizers: Roberta Cauchi-Santoro (School of Languages and Literatures, University of Guelph); Alessia Ursella (School of English and Theatre Studies, University of Guelph) 


Session’s Chair: TBA


This session welcomes contributions on various aspects of intersectional feminism in Italy, or more specifically on the diverse and multilayered experiences of women from all walks of life and backgrounds in the Italian context. Intersectionality indeed provides a means of analyzing power structures, social realities, and meaning-making that is at once painstaking but also refined and cogent. Over the past decade, the field of intersectionality studies has emerged as one of the most significant contributions to feminist critical theory and research. It has also become one of the most debated and contested approaches, both within and outside feminist studies. How has intersectionality been used to map and construe the debates in Italian feminism? How has intersectionality in Italian feminist studies been reconfigured, particularly when confronting the complexity of embodiment?


Please submit a 150-word abstract in English or Italian and a short bio to Roberta Cauchi-Santoro (rcauchis@uoguelph.ca) and Alessia Ursula (aursella@uoguelph.ca). Deadline for abstract submissions is February 15, 2018




20) Italian Dialects


Organizer: Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano (Associate Professor and Chair, DLLL, York University)


Session’s Chair: TBA


This very broad session welcomes papers on any aspect pertaining to the study of the dialects of Italy, from diachronic or synchronic perspectives; descriptive, theoretical and other approaches; syntax, morphology, semantics, dialect literature (theatre, poetry, prose); initiatives to promote dialects in Italy; challenges and issues vis-à-vis Italian dialects, Italian dialects in contact situations, dialects online, etc.


Using the paper proposal form on the CSIS Conference website, please submit a 150-word abstract and a short biography to Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano (roberta@yorku.ca).  Submissions expected no later than February 15, 2018.




21) Italian Food Studies


Organizer: Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano (Associate Professor and Chair, DLLL, York University)


Session’s Chair: TBA


This session welcomes papers that look at Italian culture through the food lens and focuses on all aspects related to topics such as Italian food and literature; Italian food and language; Italian food and ethnicity; Italian food history; Italian food representations online; Italian cookbooks, recipes, menus, restaurants, chefs; political and social movements around Italian food; the EATALY experience; “teaching Italian food” and experiences with university courses that focus on culinary Italy; Italian food and globalization, etc.


Using the paper proposal form on the CSIS Conference website, please submit a 150-word abstract and a short biography to Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano (roberta@yorku.ca).  Submissions expected no later than February 15, 2018.




22) The Concept of Resistance in Italy: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

 

Organizers: Maria Laura Mosco (Western University); Pietro Pirani (Western University)


Session’s Chair: TBA


Aiming at fostering a novel reflection on the legacy of the Italian resistance to Fascism and the Resistance Movement born in the latest years of WWII, this panel invites contributions that investigate their representations, and the more abstract philosophical concept of resistance, in the Italian context, in a rapidly changing globalized world, with oppressive political orders, new global economic structures, and emerging new philosophical discussion fields. From literary studies, cinema, history, and music, to philosophy, but not necessarily limited to these fields of inquiry, the objective of this panel is to allow for a much needed and diversified discussion on the subject, casting away the usual divide among disciplines in Arts and Social Sciences.

 

Please submit a 150-word abstract in English, Italian or French, a short bio, and audio-visual needs to Maria Laura Mosco (mmosco@uwo.ca) and to Pietro Pirani (ppirani2@uwo.ca) by February 15th, 2018.

Contact Us


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University of Florida

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

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